Jade's autopsy pictures


Jade

Pancreas.




Jade

Pancreas.




Jade

Lower abdomen.




Jade

Lower abdomen.




Jade

Left kidney in fat.




Jade

Half left kidney.




Jade

Half right kidney.




Jade

Spleen with ?.




Jade


Jade



Jade

Abscessed mouth/ lip from outside (the part we cut off for pathology).




Jade

Cut off side of mouth.




Jade

Inside of gum.




Jade

Inside of gum.




Jade

Inside of gum.





Jade's histopathology report:


History

Low blood glucose, alopecia. Samples from:- upper lip, left and right kidney, spleen and ? adrenal gland.

Diagnosis

Lymphoma (Lymphosarcoma) and Glomerulonephritis

Prognosis

Not Applicable


Histopathology report

Haired-skin, kidney, spleen and pancreas are examined (2 slides, 6 sections).

In the skin, there is a diffuse inflammatory infiltrate, mainly neutrophilic, associated with deposits of basophilic debris and fewer plasma cells. PAS and Gram stains are negative for fungi and bacteria.

In the kidney, there is thickening of the basement membrane and mesangium of many glomeruli. Some tufts are completely collapsed and fibrotic (glomerular sclerosis). There is moderate increase in interstitial fibrous tissue. A focus of osseous metaplasia is present.

The pancreas has multifocal and marked exocrine nodular hyperplasia (Incidental finding).

The spleen has been effaced by nodular aggregates of intermediately differentiated lymphoid cells. The majority of these cells have rather small nuclei (approx 1x RBC diameter), moderately hyperchromatic, without prominent nucleoli, but with a rather open appearance featuring coarsely clumped chromatin; not the densely stained appearance of normal small lymphocyte nuclei. Mitoses are infrequent (generally <1 per high power field).

COMMENTS:

The spleen of this ferret had been effaced by a population consistent with a small-cell lymphoma, low or intermediate grade. Malignant lymphoma (lymphosarcoma) is the commonest malignancy of the domestic ferret. It most commonly arises spontaneously, although there is increasing evidence of a transmissible form. Several variants of the disease exist; a small-cell type is more commonly encountered in older animals (as here) whilst a lymphoblastic form is seen more frequently in younger (less than 2 years old) ferrets. The disease eventually spreads to multiple organs, causing multi-systemic disease.

There was also an incidental suppurative dermatitis and evidence of chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

No adrenal gland was included.