Charlie's autopsy pictures


Lymph node

Lymph node

Chest white mass lymph nodes

Chest white mass lymph nodes

Chest white mass lymph nodes

Chest white mass lymph nodes

Chest white mass lymph nodes

Heart

Heart

Heart

Heart right side

Liver

Liver

Liver

Liver

Liver

Pancreas

Chest cavity

Heart

Right kidney

Left kidney



Charlie's histopathlogy report

Diagnosis Lymphoma (Lymphosarcoma)
Prognosis Not Applicable

Histopathology Result

Sections from necropsy samples of various tissues from a 5.5-year-old, male, Ferret were examined microscopically.

LIVER; 1 sample received; 1 section examined. Microscopy reveals large, often coalescing nodules composed of solid sheets of intermediately differentiated lymphocytes, often, but not invariably, centred upon blood vessels; all together these comprise some 30-40% of the total area of this section of liver. The cells have a moderate amount of pale-staining cytoplasm and somewhat variably-sized, round to irregular nuclei with a rather variable chromatin pattern (finely stippled to coarsely clumped) and some with a small but distinct nucleolus. Mitoses are frequent (up to 10 per single high power field). The intervening hepatic parenchyma is markedly congested.

KIDNEY; 1 sample received; 1 section examined. Apart from several tiny foci of interstitial infiltration with normal-looking lymphocytes and one or two dilated tubules, both findings considered to be of negligible pathological significance, this is histologically largely unremarkable.

LUNG; 1 sample received; 1 section examined. This is mildly congested. There is a substantial focus of so-called phospholipidosis - alveoli filled with foamy macrophages - immediately beneath the pleura and associated with two small nodules of bone (osseous metaplasia). This is a fairly common incidental finding of negligible significance. There are also several smallish foci of lymphocytic infiltration, but with normal-looking rather than overtly neoplastic lymphocytes and again of little significance.

HEART; 1 sample received; 1 section examined. The myocardium is largely normal in appearance, but residual blood in the lumen contains a few atypical lymphocytes.

LYMPH NODES; 2 received; 2 sections examined. One of these was submitted as possible pancreas and has a small portion of that organ attached, but is mostly lymph node. The other is identified on the submission form as prescapular lymph node. Both nodes have similar changes, their normal architecture being completely effaced by solid sheets of intermediately differentiated lymphocytes identical to those seen and described in the liver (qv). The attached portion of pancreas is histologically unremarkable.

DIAGNOSIS: Lymphoma.

DISCUSSION: Malignant lymphoma (lymphosarcoma) is the commonest malignancy of the domestic ferret. It most commonly arises spontaneously, although there is increasing evidence of a transmissible form. Several variants of the disease exist: a small-cell type is more commonly encountered in older animals while the lymphoblastic form is seen more frequently in younger (less than 2 years old) ferrets. In this particular case, the lymphocytes are somewhat intermediate in morphology.